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Suicide Six
[[Image:|100px|center]]
[[Image:|200px|center]]
Location:
Nearest city: Pomfret, Vermont
Coordinates: °    °   
Top Elevation: 1,200 feet (370 m)
Base Elevation: 550 feet (170 m)
Skiable Area: 100 acres (40 ha)
Runs: 23
Lift system: 2 double chairs, 1 J-bar
Web page: suicide6.com


Suicide Six is the name of a ski resort in South Pomfret, Vermont. It has some claim to historical fame as a very early ski resort. In January 1934, an improvised rope tow, said to be the first ski lift in the Eastern United States, was installed on a hill located on Clinton Gilbert's farm. The rope tow was originally powered with a a Ford Model T engine. By the following month, Wallace "Bunny" Bertram (a former ski coach at Dartmouth College who had helped build the original rope lift) took over the operation, and installed a more reliable electric motor. A few years later he moved his operation to a steeper hill nearby, shown on the map as "Hill 6".[1] Bertram once joked that to ski down the nearby Hill No. 6 would be suicide. Two years later the resort was opened using this name and photos of Bertram can be seen in the resort museum in the base lodge. Devotees of ski mountaineering and backcountry skiing mark this as the beginning of the divergence of resort skiing and traditional backcountry skiing.

Suicide Six was the location of the first National Snow Surfing Championships in 1982, considered an important event in the development of snowboarding as a sport.[2][3]

In a 2004 article, the Boston Globe described Suicide Six as "steeped in history", and now a "low key" location for "a taste of rural skiing".[4]

References

  1. James Tabor, "Bunny's Boost: Woodstock and Suicide Six, Vt., the birthplace of America's first ski lift, offer sweet skiing, feel-good charm, and a history lesson." Ski Magazine, March 1992. Copy available at Google Books.
  2. Paul J. MacArthur, "The Top Ten Important Moments in Snowboarding History", Smithsonian, February 5, 2010.
  3. Stephen Jermanok, "Snowboarders Agree: Suicide Six Is To Die For", Boston Globe, February 3, 2002.
  4. Marty Basch, "Suicide Six", Boston Globe, March 4, 2004.

External links

This article uses material from the Wikipedia article Suicide Six, that was deleted or is being discussed for deletion, which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.
Author(s): Xenobot Search for "Suicide Six" on Google
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This article uses material from the Wikipedia article Suicide Six, that was deleted or is being discussed for deletion, which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.
Author(s): WookieInHeat Search for "Suicide Six" on Google
View Wikipedia's deletion log of "Suicide Six"
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This article uses material from the Wikipedia article Suicide Six, that was deleted or is being discussed for deletion, which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.
Author(s): Northamerica1000 Search for "Suicide Six" on Google
View Wikipedia's deletion log of "Suicide Six"
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