FANDOM



International public opinion is largely opposed to the war in Afghanistan. A 47-nation global survey of public opinion conducted in June 2007 by the Pew Global Attitudes Project found considerable opposition to the NATO military operations in Afghanistan. In 2 out of the 47 countries was there a majority that favoured keeping troops in Afghanistan – Israel (59%) and Kenya (60%).[1] On the other hand, in 41 of the 47 countries pluralities want NATO troops out of Afghanistan as soon as possible.[1] In 32 out of 47 countries majorities want NATO troops out of Afghanistan as soon as possible. Majorities in 7 out of 12 NATO member countries want troops withdrawn as soon as possible.[1][2][3]

The 24-nation Pew Global Attitudes survey in June 2008 again found that majorities or pluralities in 21 of 24 countries want NATO troops removed from Afghanistan as soon as possible. In 3 out of the 24 countries – the U.S. (50%), Australia (60%), and Britain (48%) – did public opinion lean more toward keeping troops there until the situation has stabilized.[4][5] Since then, public opinion in Australia and Britain has shifted, and the majority of Australians and British now also want their troops to be brought home from Afghanistan.[6][7][8][9] Of the seven NATO countries in the survey, not one showed a majority in favor of keeping NATO troops in Afghanistan – one, the U.S., came close to a majority (50%). Of the other six NATO countries, five had majorities of their population wanting NATO troops removed from Afghanistan as soon as possible.[5]

The 25-nation Pew Global Attitudes survey in June 2009 continued to find that the war in Afghanistan is unpopular in most nations[10] and that most publics want American and NATO troops out of Afghanistan.[11] The 2009 global survey reported that majorities or pluralities in 18 out of 25 countries want NATO to remove their troops from Afghanistan as soon as possible.[10] (Changes from 2008 included Tanzania, South Africa, and Australia having been replaced by Israel, Kenya, the Palestinian Territories, and Canada in the survey, and shifts in opinions in India and Nigeria.) In 4 out of 25 countries was there a majority that favoured keeping NATO troops in Afghanistan – the U.S. (57%), Israel (59%), Kenya (56%), and Nigeria (52%).[10] Despite American calls for NATO allies to send more troops to Afghanistan, there was majority or plurality opposition to such action in every one of the NATO countries surveyed: Germany (63% opposition), France (62%), Poland (57%), Canada (55%), Britain (51%), Spain (50%), and Turkey (49%).[12]

In Europe, polls in France, Germany, Britain, and other countries show that the European public want their troops to be pulled out and less money spent on the war in Afghanistan.[8][13][14][15]

December

  • Afghanistan: 68% of Afghans support the presence of U.S. troops. 62% support the presence of NATO troops.[16]
  • Canada: 66% oppose sending any more troops despite the recently reported plans by the United States and Britain to do so. 28% would support sending any more troops. 53% also continue to oppose their country's involvement in military operations, while 42% support it. The Angus Reid poll was conducted December 1–2, 2009.[17]
  • France: 82% are opposed to their government sending more troops, while 17% support doing so. The Ifop / Sud-Ouest Dimanche poll was conducted December 3–4, 2009.[18][19][20][21]
  • Germany: 69% want a full withdrawal of German troops, while 27% disagreed.[22][23]
  • Poland: 76% want a withdrawal of their country's military, with many seeing little hope for a successful conclusion. The public opinion poll was conducted in December 2009.[24]
  • Spain: Nearly half oppose their government's decision to send another 500 more troops. A plurality of 48% consider their government's decision to be "bad" or "very bad", while 22% considered it to be "good" or "very good". Another 26% consider the decision "normal" among the choice of responses available to them in the poll. The El Mundo poll was conducted December 23–29, 2009.[25][26]
  • United States: 55% oppose the war, while 43% support it. A remaining 3% had no opinion. The CNN – Opinion Research poll was conducted December 16–20, 2009.[27]
  • United States: 58% feel less confident that the war will come to a successful conclusion, while 30% feel more confident. 56% think it is unlikely that U.S. troops will begin to withdraw in 18 months – as announced by the U.S. president – while 39% think it is likely. In a statistical tie within the poll's ±3% margin of error, 55% support increasing troops levels, while 49% oppose sending more troops. Also in a statistical tie within the poll's ±3% margin of error, 44% think the U.S. president's plan is the right approach, while 41% think it is the wrong approach. The NBC / Wall Street Journal poll was conducted December 11–14, 2009.[28]
  • United States: 56% continue to oppose sending more U.S. troops, while 42% favor it, compared to 54% opposition and 43% support in November. 57% oppose the war, while 39% support it, unchanged from November. The AP-GfK poll was conducted December 10–14, 2009.[29][30]
  • United Kingdom: 56% remain opposed to their country's involvement, while 36% support it. 56% also oppose their prime minister's plan to send an additional 500 British soldiers in the next few weeks, while 35% support it. The Angus Reid poll was conducted December 2–4, 2009.[31]
  • United States: 51% oppose the war, while 46% support it, a statistical tie within the poll's margin of error of ±3 points. A remaining 2% had no opinion. The CNN – Opinion Research poll was conducted December 2–3, 2009.[27]
  • United States: Americans are split on sending 30,000 more troops, the figure that was just announced by U.S. President Obama: 36% think the number is too high, 38% think number is about right, while 18% think it is too low. 47% agree with setting a timetable to begin withdrawing some troops, while 46% think it is too soon to set one. 21% agree with the announced timetable to begin withdrawing some troops in 2011, while 26% think the U.S. "should start withdrawing troops sooner" than that. 69% of Democrats agree with setting a timetable for beginning to withdraw some troops, with 27% agreeing with the announced timetable of 2011 and 35% wanting a withdrawal of troops to begin before 2011 arrives. 72% of Republicans think it is too soon to set a timetable. 43% of Democrats think the number of new troops being sent to Afghanistan is too high, while 35% of Republicans feel it is too low. The USA Today / Gallup poll was conducted December 2, 2009 just after U.S. President Obama announced that 30,000 more U.S. troops would be sent to Afghanistan while setting a timetable that calls for the U.S. to begin withdrawing some unspecified number of troops in 2011.[32]
  • United States: 49% support the U.S. military operation, down 5 points from October, while 42% oppose it, up 7 points from October. 47% support President Obama's plan, while 40% oppose it. 22% think a clear U.S. military victory is likely, while 37% think a negotiated settlement that gives the Taliban some role in the Afghan government is likely. 56% are not confident that the Obama administration will be able to "finish the job", while 31% are. The Angus Reid poll was conducted December 1–2, 2009 just after U.S. President Obama announced that 30,000 more U.S. troops would be sent to Afghanistan.[33]

November

  • Denmark: Nearly half want a deadline for withdrawing their soldiers. A plurality of 49% want a deadline for the withdrawal of their country's troops, while 37% do not. 47% support the operation, while 39% oppose it, and 14% did not answer or were undecided. The Catinet / Ritzau poll was conducted November 7–9, 2009.[34]
  • Germany: 65% oppose their country's military presence and want their troops to be withdrawn before the next federal election in 2013, while 29% disagreed. The Bild am Sontag / Emnid poll was conducted November 27, 2009.[35][36][37]
  • United Kingdom: 71% want their troops out within a year. Seven out of 10 want a phased withdrawal leading to an end of combat operations with 12 months, while 22% disagreed. 47% say their country's continued military participation makes terrorism more likely at home, while 44% say it does not. The ComRes poll for the Independent was conducted November 11–12, 2009.[38][39][40][41]
  • United Kingdom: The majority reject the main justification given to them by the British government to justify its military presence. Four out of five do not believe that British military involvement keeps the streets of Britain safe from terrorist attacks, and 21% accept the government's claim. 46% feel that the British military participation in the war actually increases the threat of attack in Britain. The GFK NOP poll for the Independent was conducted November 7–8, 2009.[42][43][44]
  • United Kingdom: 63% want "all" their troops to be withdrawn "as quickly as possible". 31% disagreed. 64% also said the war is unwinnable, while 27% disagreed. 52% said the levels of corruption involved in the recent presidential election demonstrated that the war is "not worth fighting for", while 36% disagreed. 54% felt they had a good understanding of the purpose of the military presence, while 42% disagreed. The BBC/ComRes poll was conducted November 4–5, 2009.[45][46][47]
  • United Kingdom: 73% want their troops to be withdrawn immediately or within the next year or so: 35% want British troops brought home "immediately" and 38% said "most troops should be withdrawn soon, and the rest within the next year or so." 20% thought the UK military force should remain. 85% believe British troops are currently losing the war: 57% believe that military victory is not possible, 28% thought eventual victory was possible, and 5% believed British troops were winning. The Channel 4 News / YouGov poll was conducted November 4–5, 2009.[47][48][49]
  • United States: 48% oppose sending any more U.S. troops, while 47% support sending more troops. A plurality of 39% want to begin to reduce the number of U.S. troops. 67% of Democrats oppose sending any more U.S. troops, and 57% of Democrats want to begin to reduce the number of U.S. troops. 72% of Republicans want to send more U.S. soldiers. The USA Today / Gallup poll was conducted November 20–22, 2009.[50]
  • United States: 59% oppose sending any more U.S. troops, with a plurality of 39% want a decrease of the number of U.S. troops and 20% saying the number should remain unchanged. 32% support sending any more U.S. troops. 53% think that a troop increase would not make the situation better, while 36% think that it would. 69% now think that the war is going badly for the United States, an increase from 53% in September and the highest level since the poll question was first asked in 2003. 23% believe that the war is going well for the United States, down 12 points from September and the lowest level since 2003. The change in view occurred in particular among Republicans: In September, 47% of Republicans believed the war was going well for the United States. In November, the figure was 27%. The CBS News poll was conducted November 13–16, 2009.[51]
  • United States: 52% oppose the war, while 45% support it. A remaining 3% had no opinion. The CNN – Opinion Research poll was conducted November 13–15, 2009.[27]
  • United States: 52% say the war is not worth fighting, a new high in opposition for the poll question first asked in 2007, while 44% say it is worth fighting, a new low in support. 76% do not feel that withdrawing would increase the risk of terrorism in the U.S. while 23% feel that it would. 58% are not confident that the current Afghan government will be able to train an Afghan army that can effectively take over security there "at some point", while 38% are. In politically asymmetrical views, 66% of Democrats say the war is not worth fighting, while, on the other hand, 60% of Republicans say that it is worth fighting. Nearly half of Democrats, 48%, feel strongly that the war in Afghanistan is not worth fighting, while 43% of Republicans feel strongly that it is. The ABC News / Washington Post poll was conducted November 12–15, 2009.[52][53][54][55][56]
  • United States: 57% oppose the war, while 39% favor it. A plurality of 37% "strongly oppose" the war, while 15% "strongly favor" it. 54% oppose sending any more U.S. troops, up from 50% the previous month, while 43% favor doing so, down from 46% the previous month. A plurality of 38% "strongly oppose" sending any more troops. The Associated Press – GfK poll was conducted November 5–9, 2009.[57][58]
  • United States: 51% oppose sending any more U.S. troops. A plurality of 44% want the number of U.S. troops to be reduced, and 7% want the number to be kept unchanged. 7% want an increase of less than 40,000, while 35% support an increase of 40,000 troops. 60% of Democrats want President Obama to begin reducing troop levels. The Gallup poll was conducted November 5–8, 2009.[59][60][61]
  • United States: 58% oppose the war, while 40% support it. 56% also oppose sending any more U.S. troops, while 42% favor doing so. 64% do not think that there will "eventually" be "a stable democratic government in Afghanistan that can maintain order in the country without assistance from U.S. troops." 32% think this will eventually occur. The CNN / Opinion Research poll was conducted October 30 – November 1, 2009.[62][63]
  • United States: 59% oppose sending any more U.S. troops to the war. A plurality of 40% want the number of U.S. troops to be reduced, and 19% want the number of troops to remain unchanged. 32% support a troop increase. 57% think the military effort is not going well, while 36% believe it is. The Pew Research poll was conducted October 28 – November 8, 2009.[64]

October

  • Australia: 51% do not want their country to continue to be involved militarily, while 46% do. 52% are not confident that Australia has clear aims in Afghanistan, while 47% were.[65][66]
  • Canada: 56% oppose their country's military involvement, an increase of opposition from 52% in July. 37% support the military involvement, a drop in support from 43% in July. The Angus Reid poll was conducted October 5–10, 2009.[67]
  • Japan: The plurality 48% supported their government's decision to end their country's naval refueling mission in support of the military campaign, while 37% opposed it.[68]
  • United Kingdom: 62% want their troops to be withdrawn immediately or within the next year or so: 25% want British troops brought home "immediately" and 37% said "most troops should be withdrawn soon, and the rest within the next year or so." 29% thought the UK military force should remain past the next year. 84% believe British troops are currently losing the war. A plurality of 48% believe that military victory is not possible, 36% thought eventual victory was possible, and 6% believed British troops were winning.[69][70]
  • United Kingdom: 68% want their troops withdrawn "now" or "within the next year or so". The plurality 36% want their troops "withdrawn from Afghanistan now", while 32% want a firm timetable set for "withdrawing British troops within the next year or so" that should be adhered to "regardless of the situation in Afghanistan at the time". 27% think British troops should remain until the Taleban is defeated and the situation is stable. The percentage of Britons wanting an immediate withdrawal rose 7 points from 29% to 36% from mid-September. The Populus / Times poll was conducted October 9–11, 2009.[47][71][72][73]
  • United Kingdom: 59% oppose their country's military involvement, an increase of opposition from 53% in July. 35% support the military involvement, a drop in support from 39% in July. The Angus Reid poll was conducted October 5–10, 2009.[67]
  • United Kingdom: 63% think their troops are "fighting a war that can't be won," while 27% think it is "a war that must be won." 45% disagree that the war is worthwhile "to defeat terrorism," while 44% agree that it is. 44% disagree that troops in Afghanistan make them safer in Britain, while 42% agree that they do.[47][74]
  • United Kingdom: 56% oppose their country's military operations, while 37% support the operations.[47][75][76][77][78]
  • United States: 59% oppose sending any more U.S. troops, while 39% support doing so. 49% call for a partial or complete withdrawal of U.S. troops: 28% want their country to withdraw all U.S. troops, 21% want a reduction of U.S. troops, and 8% think the numbers should stay as they are. 52% think the eight-year long war has turned into a situation like the Vietnam War, while 46% do not. More than two-thirds say it's unlikely that Afghanistan will have stable government in the next few years. Six in 10 think it's necessary to keep U.S. forces "now" to "prevent additional acts of terrorism in the U.S.", while 39% do not. The CNN – Opinion Research poll was conducted October 16–18, 2009. In this poll, CNN did not ask, or did not publish results for, the question "Do you favor or oppose the U.S. war in Afghanistan?" that it had asked in 10 previous polls.[79][80][81][82]
  • United States: 49% feel the war is not worth fighting, while 47% do. 49% feel that Obama should not order the additional troops requested by U.S. military commanders, while 47% do. 60% of Democrats oppose sending any more troops, while 69% of Republicans favor sending more troops. 36% of Democrats feel the war is worth fighting, while 71% of Republicans do.[83][84][85]
  • United States: 54% support their country's military involvement, down slightly from 55% in July. 35% oppose the military involvement, unchanged from July. The Angus Reid poll was conducted October 5–10, 2009.[67]
  • United States: 56% say they want the size of the American military presence to stay the same or be reduced. 38% favor drawing down U.S. troop levels, while 37% favor increasing the number, a statistical tie within the poll's margin of error of ±3 points. 17% favor keeping troop levels the same. 52% of Democrats want to decrease the number of U.S. troops in Afghanistan, while 57% of Republicans want to increase the number of U.S. troops 27% of Democrats support sending more troops. According to the poll, 51% of Americans think the U.S is doing the right thing in fighting the war, while 39% think the U.S. is not doing the right thing: 76% of Republicans think the U.S. is doing the right thing by fighting the war, while, on the other hand, the plurality 49% of Democrats think the U.S. should not be involved in Afghanistan.[86][87]
  • United States: 48% support sending more U.S. troops, while 45% oppose sending any more troops, a statistical tie within the poll's margin of error of ±5 points. 38% want President Obama to begin to withdraw U.S. troops. Half, 50%, of Democrats, and 44% of independents, want President Obama to begin to withdraw U.S. troops. 59% of Democrats, and 50% of independents, oppose sending any more troops, while 73% of Republicans support sending more troops. The USA Today / Gallup poll was conducted October 6, 2009.[88][89]
  • United States: 57% oppose the war, while 40% favor the war. 50% oppose sending more troops, while 46% favor sending more troops. A plurality of 34% "strongly oppose" sending more troops. 57% of Democrats oppose sending more troops, while 69% of Republicans favor sending more troops. 46% approve of the way Barack Obama is handling the situation, while 41% disapprove.[90][91][92]
  • United States: 54% oppose an increase in troops: A plurality of 40% want the U.S. to "decrease the number of troops in Afghanistan and begin to get out", 14% want to keep the number the same as there is now, while 38% would increase the number of U.S. troops. 68% think the war "will go on and on without a clear resolution", while 20% think the United States will eventually win. 55% think the war has been unsuccessful, while 42% believe it has been successful. 17% of Democrats support sending more troops. 61% of Democrats want to decrease U.S. troop numbers and begin to get out. The Clarus Research poll was conducted October 1–4, 2009.[93]

September

  • Canada: 82% want Canada to end its combat role and either focus on training and development only or bring the Canadian troops home as soon as possible: 45% want Canada to end the combat role and "provide help in training and development only" and 37% want their troops to just "leave Afghanistan as soon as possible". 12% thought Canadian troops should "stay in combat roles until the war is won", while 6% did not know or refused to answer. The Leger Marketing poll was conducted September 22–25, 2009.[94]
  • Finland: About half of Finns say Finland should continue its peacekeeping role. 65% do not think furthering human rights and democracy in Afghanistan is likely, while 25% were optimistic of the outcome. While 50% said Finland should not withdraw its peacekeeping troops charged with supporting provincial government security, 35% want them withdrawn. 44% think the peacekeeping troops should remain as long as needed, while 27% want them withdrawn within a year. 16% had no opinion on the matter. The Helsingin Sanomat / Suomen Gallup poll was conducted September 14–15, 2009.[95][96][97]
  • Germany: 54% oppose their country's military operations, and 44% support them. 58% oppose any extension of the mission, and 39% support one. The ZDF – Tagesspiegel poll was conducted September 11, 2009.[98][99]
  • Germany: 55% want their troops brought home from the war. The Forsa Institute poll was conducted September 10–11, 2009.[100][101]
  • Germany: 57% want the withdrawal of their troops "as soon as possible", while 37% do not. The ARD – Deutschlandtrend poll was conducted September 10, 2009.[98][102][103][104]
  • Italy: 58% are against the war and want their soldiers brought back, while 26% supported keeping the troops there. The remaining 16% did not know. The ISPO – Corriere della Sera poll was conducted in the second week of September, before the deaths of 6 Italian soldiers in a suicide bomb attack in Kabul on September 17, Italy's' deadliest day in the war to date.[105]
  • Netherlands: 70% oppose extending their country's military deployment past 2010. 21% support continuing the mission after 2010. The Maurice de Hond poll was conducted September 24, 2009.[106]
  • Poland: 76% oppose the continued presence of their country's military in Afghanistan, and 77% want the military operation ended immediately, a 12 point increase from a survey in June. 20% support the military involvement, with support falling consistently each month. The CBOS poll was conducted in September.[107][108]
  • United States: 60% oppose increasing the number of troops: 40% favor an increase, 37% want the number of troops to be reduced, and 23% think they should be kept the same. 56% think the U.S. is not winning the war, while 10% think it is. 33% were not sure. The Economist / YouGov poll was conducted September 27–29, 2009.[109]
  • United States: 48% oppose sending any more U.S. troops. 41% want to begin to withdraw U.S. troops, while 41% favor sending more troops. 7% think the number should be kept the same as it is. 62% of Democrats oppose sending any more U.S. troops and 53% of Democrats want to begin to withdraw U.S. troops. 63% of Republicans favor sending more troops. 30% of Democrats support sending more U.S. troops. The USA Today/Gallup poll was conducted September 22–23, 2009.[110]
  • United States: 59% oppose sending any more U.S. troops. 32% want a reduction of U.S. troops, while 27% want the number to remain as it is. 29% support sending any additional U.S. troops. 55% are only willing to have large numbers of U.S. troops remain for no longer than 2 more years: The plurality 31% are only willing to have large numbers of U.S. troops remain less than 1 year, and another 24% accept 1 or 2 years. 27% are willing to have large numbers of U.S. troops stay longer than 5 more years. 51% think the war is going badly for the U.S., while 35% think it is going well. 47% think the U.S. is doing the right thing by fighting the war, while 42% think the U.S. should not be involved now. 56% think the situation is staying about the same, while 26% think it is getting worse, and 8% think it is getting better. 68% think the U.S. military actions have not decreased the threat of terrorism in the U.S. 51% think the threat of terrorism against the U.S. has stayed about the same, 27% think that it has decreased, and 17% think that it has increased, as a result of the U.S. military actions. 51% think the threat of terrorism to the United States would either stay the same or even decrease if the U.S. withdrew its troops: 42% think it would stay about the same, 43% think it would increase, and 9% think it would decrease if the U.S. withdrew its troops. The New York Times/CBS News poll was conducted September 19–23, 2009.[111][112]
  • United States: 59% are less confident the war will come to a successful conclusion. 51% oppose sending any more U.S. troops, while 44% support doing so. 55% do not think the U.S. should have an immediate and orderly withdrawal of all troops, while 38% do think the U.S. should have an immediate and orderly withdrawal of all troops. 43% think the U.S. should not devote time and troops to try building a strong, stable government, while 47% feel the U.S. should help build a strong, stable government. The NBC News / Wall Street Journal poll was conducted September 17–20, 2009.[113][114]
  • United States: 50% say that NATO troops should remain "until the situation has stabilized.", a decline from 57% in June, while 43% want to remove troops as soon as possible, an increase from 38% in June. 56% of Democrats want to remove NATO troops as soon as possible, 71% of Republicans favor keeping them there. By nearly two to one, 55% to 29%, Republicans thought the U.S. is making progress rather than losing ground in defeating the Taliban militarily. The Pew Research Center poll was conducted September 10–15, 2009.[115][116][117]
  • United States: 55% are not confident that U.S. policies will be successful, and 14% are confident. A plurality of 42% believe the situation is getting worse, while 8% believe it is getting better. The plurality 42% see no difference between the situation for U.S. troops in Afghanistan and in Iraq, while 36% think the situation is worse in Afghanistan than in Iraq. The Harris poll was conducted September 8–15, 2009.[118]
  • United States: 58% oppose the war, while 39% support the war. 23% of Democrats and 39% independents support the war, while 62% of Republicans support the war. 75% of Democrats oppose the war. The CNN – Opinion Research poll was conducted September 11–13, 2009.[82][119]
  • United States: "Americans are broadly skeptical of President Obama's contention that the war in Afghanistan is necessary for the war against terrorism to be a success, and few see an increase in troops as the right thing to do." A plurality of 42% want a reduction of the number of U.S. troops. 26% think more troops should be sent. 28% think they should be kept "about the same". 56% of Democrats want a reduction of the number of U.S. troops. The plurality 41% of independents also want a reduction of U.S. troops. The plurality 39% of Republicans want more troops to be sent to the war. 51% of Americans think the war is not worth fighting, while 46% think it is. Fewer than half think winning the war is necessary to win the "war on terrorism", with about as many saying it is not. 59% of Democrats think the "war on terrorism" can be a success without winning in Afghanistan, while 66% of Republicans think the war must be won to win the "war on terrorism". The Washington Post – ABC News poll was conducted September 10–12, 2009.[120][121]* Netherlands: 37% approve of their country's military deployment. The poll by the defence ministry was reported in the news on September 8, 2009. The percentage opposed to the military deployment was not given.[122]

August

  • France: 64% oppose their country's military intervention, while 36% favour it. The Ifop / Le Figaro poll was conducted August 10–18, 2009.[123]
  • New Zealand: 61% agree with their government's decision to extend the non-combat stay of 140 troops working on reconstruction projects in Afghanistan, while 25% disagree, and 13% are unsure. On the other hand, New Zealanders are divided on whether to send SAS (Special Air Service) soldiers back, following a request made by the United States. 47% would support this measure, while 44% would oppose it, a statistical tie within the poll's ±5% margin of error. The remaining 9% were unsure.[124][125]
  • Pakistan: 80% oppose their government's cooperation with the United States on its "war against terror", while 18% support it.[126]
  • United Kingdom: 62% oppose their country's troops remaining, while 26% were in favour. The Daily Telegraph / YouGov poll was conducted in August 2009.[127]
  • United Kingdom: 66% think their troops are "fighting a war that can't be won", while 24% thought they were "fighting a war that must be won". 50% disagree that the war is worthwhile "to defeat terrorism", while 39% agree that it is. 46% disagree that troops make them safer in Britain, while 40% agree that they do. The Sun / YouGov poll was conducted August 28–29, 2009.[128]
  • United Kingdom: More than half are against their country's military involvement. 53% disagree with the British military deployment, while 25% agree with it. The ICM Research / National Army Museum was conducted August 21–23, 2009.[129][130][131]
  • United Kingdom: More than two-thirds want their country's troops pulled out. 69% think their troops should not be fighting, while 31% thought they should. Three-quarters do not think that fighting is making them safer from terrorism as Gordon Brown and senior ministers had repeatedly been telling them recently. 72% said Gordon Brown was handling the war badly. The BPIX / Mail on Sunday poll was conducted August 20–21, 2009.[132][133]
  • United Kingdom: 57% think their troops should not be in Afghanistan, more than twice the number that think they should. The YouGov / Sky News poll was conducted August 7–10, 2009.[134][135][136][137]
  • United States: 57% oppose the war, while 42% support it. The CNN / Opinion Research poll was conducted August 28–31, 2009.[81][138][139][140][141]
  • United States: 41% want the number of U.S. troops to be reduced than the number, 25%, that support sending more U.S. troops. 48% approve of President Obama's handling of Afghanistan, and 52% think things are going badly for the U.S.. 37% believe things are going well. The CBS News poll was conducted August 27–31, 2009.[142]
  • United States: The majority oppose sending more U.S. troops. 56% oppose sending more troops, while 35% support doing so. 54% think the U.S. is not winning the war, while 29% think it is. 66% of Democrats and 67% of independents oppose sending more troops. In one group was there a majority in favor of sending more troops: 52% of Republicans. The McClatchy / Ipsos poll was conducted August 27–31, 2009,.[143]
  • United States: 59% think the "United States will withdraw...without winning", while 41% think the United States will win the war. 75% think U.S. troops will still be in Afghanistan in three years time, in 2012, while 7% did not think so and 18% were not sure. The Economist / YouGov poll was conducted August 23–25, 2009,.[144]
  • United States: 51% say the war is not worth fighting, while 47% think it is – a statistical tie within the poll's ±3% margin of error. 24% favor sending more U.S. troops, while almost twice as many, 45%, want to see the number of U.S. troops reduced. 41% "strongly" think that the war is not worth fighting, compared to 31% that "strongly" think that it is. The ABC News / Washington Post poll was conducted August 13–17, 2009.[145][146]
  • United States: Most oppose the war. In a new low in American public support for the war, 54% oppose the war, while 41% support it. Nearly two-thirds of Republicans support the warfgh. Three quarters of Democrats oppose the war.[147][148]

July

  • Canada: The majority oppose the military mission. 52% oppose the military operation, while 43% support it. 38% think their country did the right thing in sending military forces.[149][150]
  • Canada: 54% oppose their country's military participation, while support is at 34%.[151][152][153]
  • Czech Republic: Half do not want their country's soldiers – 50% disagree with the presence of Czech soldiers, while the other half approve of it.[154]
  • Finland: 62% want Finnish troops, charged with supporting provincial government security, to remain: 55% want the number of Finnish troops to remain steady, 18% want them withdrawn, and 7% would increase their number. 48% say their troops should only serve in operations with minimal likelihood of combat. 45% said they should engage the enemy if necessary.[155][156]
  • Germany: 69% believe their country's military should leave as soon as possible. This is a 5% increase since April when 64% wanted their troops to pull out as quickly as possible, and the highest figure yet from the poll on the issue.[157]
  • Italy: 56% want their government to draft a plan to withdraw all Italian soldiers either immediately or gradually. 22% want an immediate withdrawal of their troops, while 34% think a gradual withdrawal would be better. 37% oppose bringing their troops back. The remaining 7% had no opinion.[124][158]
  • Netherlands: 74% want their government to pull out all or at least most of their troops: 43% would keep a limited number of soldiers, 31% would withdraw all soldiers, 20% would maintain more or less the current role, and 3% would extend the mission beyond 2010. The remaining 4% did not know.[124][159]
  • United Kingdom: 77% feel that the cause of war is not sufficiently worthwhile to risk the lives of British troops. 15% believe the cause is worth the loss of British soldiers' lives. 8% did not know.[160][161]
  • United Kingdom: More than half think military operations are futile and want their troops to be withdrawn immediately. 58% see the war as "unwinnable" and 31% disagree. 52% want their country's troops out immediately, while 43% want them to stay. 60% do not think any more troops or resources should be sent, while 35% support reinforcement.[162][163][164]
  • United States: 53% oppose the war, while 44% support it. A plurality of 34% strongly oppose the war, 20% strongly favor it. 19% somewhat oppose the war and 20% somewhat favor it. 3% did not know or declined to answer. 66% of Republicans favor the war, while 26% of Democrats do.[165][166][167]
  • United Kingdom: The majority oppose the military mission. 53% oppose the military operation, while 39% support it. 28% think their country did the right thing in sending military forces. 53% think that their country made a mistake in sending military forces. 43% would agree with the UK government actively negotiating with the Taliban, while 37% would disagree.[149][150]
  • United Kingdom: 64% want all British forces to be withdrawn "as quickly as possible", while 33% do not.[168][169] 60% disagree with devoting any more British troops or resources, while 34% would agree.[169]
  • United Kingdom: Over two-thirds believe that their country's troops should be withdrawn either now (34%) or within the next year (33%). 29% think their troops should stay there until the situation becomes stable even if it takes many years.[170]
  • United Kingdom: 70% feel that the war is not worth risking the lives of British troops. 24% feel that it is worth risking the lives of British soldiers for.[168][171] The remaining 6% did not know. Presented with a multiple choice question of what they think should happen: 14% think more British troops should be sent there; 36% feel other countries should send more troops but not Britain; 9% think current troop levels should be maintained as long as necessary; 21% want Britain to withdraw all its troops; and 12% think all western troops should be withdrawn.[172][173]
  • United States: The majority support the military mission. 55% support the military operation, while 35% oppose it. 49% think their country did the right thing in sending military forces. 48% also feel that they do not have a clear idea of what the war is about.[149][150]
  • United States: 51% think the war is worth fighting 45%, think the war is not worth fighting – a statistical tie within the poll's ±3 point margin of error.[174][175][176] 62% approve of the way President Obama is handling the situation, while 30% do not. The American public remains closely divided on whether the United States is making significant process toward winning the war, with 46% thinking so and 42% not.[175]
  • United States: 36% think the U.S. involvement is a mistake. 54% think things are going well for the U.S. 56% of Democrats think the U.S. involvement is a mistake, while 13% of Republicans think it is a mistake. In those identifying as independents, 39% think the U.S. involvement is a mistake.[177]
  • United Kingdom: 59% want their country's troops to be withdrawn 36% think they should stay there.[178][179][180][181]
  • United Kingdom: 56% want their troops brought home within six months by the end of the year[182][183]: A plurality of 42% want the immediate withdrawal of British troops, while a further 14% want them home by the end of 2009. 36% want the troops to stay as long as needed.[181][182][184][185] Twice as many people think British troops are making no difference to the country, or even causing harm, than think they are doing good.[182][183] 47% are opposed to their country's military operations, while 46% support it.[186][187] In a previous ICM poll for the BBC in March 2008, 48% were opposed to their country's military operations, while 40% supported it.[182][185][188][189]

June

  • Germany: Two-thirds want their soldiers out of Afghanistan – and as soon as possible. One-third support the mission.[190][191]
  • Germany: 61% believe the German military should withdraw, while 33% thought they should stay. The level of opposition to the deployment is up from 59% in a similar poll in September 2008, and 52% in September 2007.[192][193]

Transatlantic Trends Survey

The German Marshall Fund of the United States, Transatlantic Trends survey 2009, conducted June 9 – July 1, 2009, had the following results:[194]

  • Bulgaria: 72% want some or all of their country's military forces to be withdrawn. 50% want Bulgarian troops to be completely withdrawn. Another 22% want their troops numbers to be reduced. 14% want their troop numbers kept at the current level, and 2% think their country should send more troops.
  • France: 51% want some or all of their country's military forces to be withdrawn. A plurality, 41%, want French troop numbers kept at the current level. 34% want their troops to be completely withdrawn, and 17% want the number of their troops to be reduced. 4% think their country should send more troops.
  • Germany: 57% want some or all of their country's military forces to be withdrawn. A plurality, 41%, want German troops to be completely withdrawn. Another 16% want the number of German troops to be reduced. 35% think the number of troops should remain the same. 7% of Germans think their country should send more troops.
  • Italy: 55% want some or all of their country's military forces to be withdrawn. A plurality, 38%, want Italian troop numbers kept at the current level. 34% want their troops to be completely withdrawn, and 21% want the number of their troops to be reduced. 6% think their country should send more troops.
  • Netherlands: 50% want some or all of their country's military forces to be withdrawn. A plurality, 43%, want Dutch troop numbers kept at the current level. 28% want their troops to be completely withdrawn, and 22% want the number of their troops to be reduced. 5% think their country should send more troops.
  • Poland: 68% want some or all of their country's military forces to be withdrawn. 51% want Polish troops to be completely withdrawn. Another 17% want the number of Polish troops to be reduced. 22% think the number of troops should remain the same. 5% think their country should send more troops.
  • Portugal: 52% want some or all of their country's military forces to be withdrawn. A plurality, 40%, want Portuguese troop numbers kept at the current level. 38% want their troops to be completely withdrawn. Another 14% want the number of Portuguese troops to be reduced. 7% of Portuguese think their country should send more troops.
  • Romania: 71% want some or all of their country's military forces to be withdrawn. 48% want Romanian troops to be completely withdrawn. 23% want their troops numbers to be reduced. 16% want their troop numbers kept at the current level, and 5% think their country should send more troops.
  • Slovakia: 61% want some or all of their country's military forces to be withdrawn. 31% want Slovak troop numbers to be reduced, 31% want troop numbers kept at the current level, and 30% want their troops to be completely withdrawn. 2% think their country should send more troops.
  • Spain: 54% want some or all of their country's military forces to be withdrawn. 37% want Spanish troops to be completely withdrawn, and another 17% want their troop numbers reduced. 37% want their troop numbers kept at the current level. 7% think their country should send more troops.
  • Turkey: 50% want some or all of their country's military forces to be withdrawn. A plurality, 30%, want Turkish troops to be completely withdrawn, and another 20% want their troops numbers to be reduced. 21% want troop numbers kept at the current level. 14% think their country should send more troops.
  • United Kingdom: 60% want some or all of their country's military forces to be withdrawn. A plurality, 41%, want British troops to be completely withdrawn. Another 19% want the number of British troops reduced. 27% think the number of troops should remain the same. 11% think their country should send more troops.
  • United States: 62% want to maintain or increase U.S. troop levels. A plurality, 32%, want U.S. troop numbers kept at the current level. 19% want their troops to be completely withdrawn, and 11% want the number of their troops to be reduced. 30% think their country should send more troops.

The 25-Nation Pew Global Attitudes Survey

The 2009 Pew Global Attitudes Survey had the following results:[10][12]

  • Argentina: 77% want NATO troops removed as soon as possible, while 6% want them kept until the situation has stabilised. 67% disapprove of U.S. President Obama sending additional troops, while 12% approve.
  • Brazil: 56% want NATO troops removed as soon as possible, while 26% want them kept until the situation has stabilised. 57% disapprove of U.S. President Obama sending additional troops, while 27% approve.
  • Canada: 50% want NATO troops to be removed as soon as possible, while 43% want them kept until the situation has stabilised. 55% disapprove of U.S. President Obama sending additional troops, while 42% approve.
  • China: 70% want NATO troops removed as soon as possible, while 16% want them kept until the situation has stabilised. 71% disapprove of U.S. President Obama sending additional troops, while 17% approve.
  • Egypt: 70% want NATO troops to be removed as soon as possible, while 19% want them kept until the situation has stabilised. 64% disapprove of U.S. President Obama sending additional troops, while 19% approve.
  • France: 49% want NATO troops removed as soon as possible, while 50% want them kept until the situation has stabilised – a statistical tie within the margin of error. 62% disapprove of U.S. President Obama sending additional troops, while 37% approve.
  • Germany: 47% want NATO troops removed as soon as possible, while 48% want them kept until the situation has stabilised – a statistical tie within the margin of error. 63% disapprove of U.S. President Obama sending additional troops, while 32% approve.
  • India: A plurality of 42% want NATO troops to be kept until the situation has stabilised, while 29% want them removed as soon as possible. A plurality 38% approve of U.S. President Obama sending additional troops, while 27% disapprove.
  • Indonesia: 66% want NATO troops to be removed as soon as possible, while 17% want them kept until the situation has stabilised. 55% disapprove of U.S. President Obama sending additional troops, while 42% approve.
  • Israel: 59% want NATO troops to be kept until the situation has stabilised, while 27% want them removed as soon as possible. 54% approve of U.S. President Obama sending additional troops, while 32% disapprove.
  • Japan: 51% want NATO troops to be removed as soon as possible, while 36% want them kept until the situation has stabilised. 62% disapprove of U.S. President Obama sending additional troops, while 28% approve.
  • Jordan: 86% want NATO troops to be removed as soon as possible, while 12% want them kept until the situation has stabilised. 66% disapprove of U.S. President Obama sending additional troops, while 11% approve.
  • Kenya: 56% want NATO troops to be kept until the situation has stabilised, while 30% want them removed as soon as possible. 53% approve of U.S. President Obama sending additional troops, while 31% disapprove.
  • Mexico: 51% want NATO troops removed as soon as possible, while 22% want them kept until the situation has stabilised. 52% disapprove of U.S. President Obama sending additional troops, while 22% approve.
  • Nigeria: 52% want NATO troops to be kept until the situation has stabilised, while 41% want them removed as soon as possible. A plurality of 49% approve of U.S. President Obama sending additional troops, while 44% disapprove.
  • Pakistan: 72% want NATO troops removed as soon as possible, while 4% want them kept until the situation has stabilised. 57% disapprove of U.S. President Obama sending additional troops, while 16% approve.
  • Palestinian Territories: 90% want NATO troops removed as soon as possible, while 5% want them kept until the situation has stabilised. 84% disapprove of U.S. President Obama sending additional troops, while 12% approve..
  • Poland: 57% want NATO troops removed as soon as possible, while 30% want them kept until the situation has stabilised. 57% disapprove of U.S. President Obama sending additional troops, while 28% approve.
  • Russia: 66% want NATO troops removed as soon as possible, while 16% want them kept until the situation has stabilised. 66% disapprove of U.S. President Obama sending additional troops, while 13% approve.
  • South Korea: The plurality 49% want NATO troops removed as soon as possible, while 38% want them kept until the situation has stabilised. 55% disapprove of U.S. President Obama sending additional troops, while 28% approve.
  • Spain: 46% want NATO troops removed as soon as possible, while 44% want them kept until the situation has stabilised – a statistical tie within the margin of error. 50% disapprove of U.S. President Obama sending additional troops, while 41% approve.
  • Turkey: 63% want NATO troops to be removed as soon as possible, while 15% want them kept until the situation has stabilised. The plurality 49% disapprove of U.S. President Obama sending additional troops, while 16% approve
  • United Kingdom: 48% want NATO troops removed as soon as possible, while 46% want them kept until the situation has stabilised – a statistical tie within the margin of error. 51% disapprove of U.S. President Obama sending additional troops, while 41% approve.
  • United States: 57% want NATO troops to be kept until the situation has stabilised, while 38% want them removed as soon as possible. 52% approve of U.S. President Obama sending additional troops, while 42% disapprove.

May

  • Afghanistan: 69% of Afghans surveyed thought it was at least mostly good that the U.S. military came in to remove the Taliban. 24% thought it was mostly or very bad. 63% of Afghans were at least somewhat supportive of a U.S. military presence in the country. 18% supported increasing the U.S. military's presence, while 44% favored reducing it. 90% of Afghans opposed the presence of Taliban fighters, including 70% who were strongly opposed. By an 82%–4% margin, people said they preferred the current government to Taliban rule.[195]
  • Australia: A plurality, 49%, oppose their government's announced increase of 450 more troops in Afghanistan, while 36% support the increase.[196]
  • Canada: Half want to end the Afghan mission before 2011, and 84% want their country's military presence to wane by 2011. 51% want the bulk of the troops to be withdrawn before 2011. 33% think the bulk of the troops should be withdrawn in 2011. 7% would keep Canadian troops in Afghanistan past 2011. 57% continue to disagree with their government's latest extension from February 2009 to 2011.[197]
  • Canada: 54% continue to be opposed to their country having troops in Afghanistan, while 39% support it. Almost 90% want their troops out of Afghanistan before or by the scheduled end date in 2011. 40% want the troops brought back early while 46% say they should be withdrawn in July 2011. 8% think the mission should continue past July 2011. 54% do not think the additional increases in U.S. troops will succeed, while 41% do.[198]
  • United States: Americans continue to be split over the war with 50% in favor and 48% opposed in a poll with a margin of error of ±3%. 36% of Americans feel things are going well for the United States in the war, while 60% say things are going poorly.[199]

April

  • Australia: Half would end their country's participation in the war. 50% want their troops to be withdrawn. 24% think the number of Australian troops should be kept the same. 14% would support increasing the number of troops if asked by the United States.[200]
  • Australia: 53% approve of Australia's military participation in Afghanistan, while 39% disapprove of it. 69% believe the United States and its allies are losing the war, while 17% believe that they are winning it.[201]
  • Canada: A majority continue to be opposed to their government's commitment to have troops in Afghanistan. Overall, 55% oppose the military mission in Afghanistan, while 40% support it. Three times more Canadians are strongly opposed to the mission (27%) than strongly support it (9%). 37% of those that support the mission would withdraw that support if the controversial Afghan law affecting women's rights is enacted.[202][203]
  • Denmark: A majority support negotiating with the Taliban to achieve peace in Afghanistan, and 53% support their country's military participation there. 47% do not think the war can be won, while 29% do.[204][205]
  • Germany: 64% want their troops to pull out of Afghanistan as quickly as possible. 32% support keeping the troops there – the lowest level of support in Germany since the poll question was asked.[206][207][208]
  • Netherlands: The majority think their government should not comply with a request by the United States to extend the presence of Dutch soldiers in Afghanistan. 59% do not want their country's troops to stay in Afghanistan after 2010. 31% think they should stay after 2010 when the current mission is due to expire.[209]
  • United Kingdom: 72% are against sending more British troops to Afghanistan. 22% support sending more troops.[210]
  • United States: 53% favor the war. 46% oppose the war. More than two-thirds back the president's plan to send roughly 20,000 more U.S. troops, while 31% oppose those planned increases. 52% would oppose sending even more U.S. troops than already announced, while 45% would support doing so.[211]
  • United States: 4 in 10 want to see more U.S. troops in Afghanistan. 51% want the troop levels to be decreased or held steady. One-third think U.S. troop levels should be decreased. 18% think troop levels should be kept the same. 52% think things are going badly for the U.S. in Afghanistan, while 36% think they are going well.[212][213]

March

  • Australia: Australians oppose sending extra troops as the death toll mounts. 66% of Australian voters, oppose sending any more Australian troops, while 30% support doing so. 51% oppose their country's involvement in the war, while 44% support it.[9][214][215][216]
  • Australia: 65% say they are against sending any more Australian troops. 28% would support an increase in Australian forces if asked by the American government. Most voters oppose sending any more troops even if asked by U.S. President Barack Obama.[217][218][219][220][221]
  • Germany: Most want all of their troops out, with 58% wanting their country's troops to come home. The mission has always been highly unpopular in Germany, and 36% were in favour of the troops staying.[222][223]
  • United Kingdom: Nearly two-thirds want British troops to be brought back home. 60% were unconvinced by their government's arguments in support of keeping a British military presence, while 35% were convinced. 30% of Britons said that they were "very unconvinced" by their government's arguments, while 8% were "very convinced" that British troops should stay.[224][225][226][227]
  • United Kingdom: 69% say that the aim of stabilising Afghanistan is not sufficiently worthwhile to risk the lives of British troops, and 64% think the war there can never be won. 64% of Britons also favour talking to the Taliban to achieve a deal, while 24% disagreed. 24% thought the aim of stabilising Afghanistan was worth risking the lives of British soldiers, 21% thought that the war can be won eventually, and 8% thought that more British troops should be sent. More Britons (26%) feel that the presence of NATO troops provokes extremism and instability in Pakistan than (21%) feel that keeping NATO troops in Afghanistan will stop the spread of instability into Pakistan. At least 43% of Britons want their troops to be withdrawn from Afghanistan.[228][229]
  • United States: American support for the war has ebbed to a new low with 42% saying that their country made a mistake in sending military forces. The figure is the highest percentage since the poll first asked the question in November 2001, a few weeks into the U.S. invasion. Those that think the war is going well dropped to 38% in the latest poll, the lowest percentage since that question was asked in September 2006.[230][231]

February

  • Canada: 52% continue to disagree with their government's latest extension of the military mission in Afghanistan until 2011, and half would end the mission. 48% want the bulk of Canadian troops to be withdrawn from Afghanistan even before the 2011 withdrawal date promised by the government. 35% think that the bulk of the troops should be withdrawn from Afghanistan in 2011. 7% think the bulk of the troops should remain past the 2011 mission end-date.[232][233]
  • Canada: 65% say no to keeping troops in Afghanistan should President Obama request it, while 20% said yes.[234]
  • Denmark: 55% believe the war against the Afghan insurgency cannot be won, while 22% think victory is possible. Another 22% remain uncertain. 48% believed Denmark should maintain troops in Afghanistan, while 41% believed Denmark should withdraw its troops from here. The poll came as Danish soldiers began negotiating with the Taliban as a necessary step to have peace in Afghanistan.[235]
  • United States: 51% are opposed to the war while 47% favor the war. 63% of those polled still said they supported President Obama's plan to increase the number of U.S. troops in Afghanistan, while 36% opposed the increase.[236]
  • United States: In results that differed from those of 4 recent polls,[237][238][239][240][241] two-thirds approved of President Obama's decision to send 17,000 more U.S. troops to Afghanistan, while one-third disapprove of the decision. One in four Americans says Obama should reduce the number of U.S. troops or withdraw them entirely. 17% of Republicans and 29% of Democrats think that the number of troops should be reduced or that the troops should be completely withdrawn. Nearly half of those polled were of the belief that Afghanistan would become stable enough within the next three years to allow most U.S. troops to be withdrawn by that time: 49% are of the belief that most U.S. troops will be withdrawn from Afghanistan within 3 years while 46% do not think so.[242][243]
  • United States: Americans are almost evenly divided about whether the United States should keep a significant number of troops in Afghanistan until the situation improves (48%) or whether it should set a timetable for withdrawal (47%).[244]

January

  • Canada: 55% oppose an extension of the mission in Afghanistan if requested by President Obama, while 30% support it.[245][246]
  • France: 53% of respondents reject sending any more troops to Afghanistan.[15][247][248]
  • Germany: 60% do not wish their government to send more troops to Afghanistan under any circumstances.[15][247][248]
  • Italy: 53% reject sending any more troops to Afghanistan.[15][247][248]
  • United Kingdom: 57% do not want to send any more troops to Afghanistan.[15][247]
  • United States: A plurality of 46% oppose the President's plan to send more U.S. troops to Afghanistan, 30% support an increase. 24% are not sure.[238]
  • United States: One-third support President Obama's plan to increase the number of U.S. troops in Afghanistan. 33% of all adults, and 27% of Democrats, support the proposed increase. The majority of Americans either think the number of troops should not be changed (21%) or the number of troops in Afghanistan should be cut (27%).[249]
  • United States: 34% support an increase, 28% do not want the number changed, and 26% want a reduction of the number of U.S. troops in Afghanistan.[240]
  • United States: More than 60% oppose sending more U.S. troops to Afghanistan, 34% support an increase.[241][250]

See also

References

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  2. Global Unease With Major World Powers
  3. Afghan war not worth it, say most Americans
  4. June 2008 Pew Global Attitudes Project Survey
  5. 5.0 5.1 24-Nation Pew Global Attitudes Project Survey p.8, p.29
  6. Britons call for troop withdrawal
  7. Australians lose faith in Afghan war effort.
  8. 8.0 8.1 Cruel human toll of fight to win Afghan peace
  9. 9.0 9.1 Poll finds 51% oppose role in Afghanistan
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  11. 25-Nation Pew Global Attitudes Survey, 2009, p.13 (PDF p.17)
  12. 12.0 12.1 25-Nation Pew Global Attitudes Survey, 2009, p.39 (PDF p.43)
  13. Obama's Unlikely Ally: Iran Signs On To Afghan Plan
  14. Afghan war exposes flaws in assumption of Nato unity
  15. 15.0 15.1 15.2 15.3 15.4 Europe opposes more troops for Afghanistan: poll
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  17. Canadians Decline Expanded Role in Afghanistan
  18. National Assembly debates military reinforcements in Afghanistan
  19. Reuters – 82% des Français contre l'envoi de renforts en Afghanistan
  20. AP – Sondage: 82% des Français opposés à un engagement supplémentaire en Afghanistan
  21. AFP – Un engagement supplémentaire en Afghanistan majoritairement rejeté par les Français
  22. Germans Mount Pressure on Afghan Withdrawal
  23. German Opposition to Afghan Fight Grows as NATO Calls for More
  24. Poland ready to increase Afghan troops
  25. Spanish oppose sending more soldiers to Afghanistan
  26. Spain split on Afghan mission
  27. 27.0 27.1 27.2 CNN / Opinion Research poll conducted January 22–24, 2010
  28. NBC / Wall Street Journal poll was conducted December 11–14, 2009
  29. AP-GfK Poll: Gains for Obama, not his Afghan plans
  30. AP-GfK poll conducted December 10–14, 2009
  31. Britons Remain Opposed to Afghanistan Mission
  32. Obama’s Plan for Afghanistan Finds Bipartisan Support
  33. Support for Afghan Mission Dwindles in U.S.
  34. Danish support for Afghanistan mission slipping: poll
  35. Berlin renews Afghan presence
  36. SPD to target Guttenberg in Afghan inquiry
  37. Peace vigil against the extension of the Bundeswehr deployment in Afghanistan
  38. 71% support Afghan withdrawal: poll
  39. Seven out of 10 Brits want their army out of Afghanistan
  40. Support grows for Afghanistan pullout: poll
  41. War in Afghanistan: Not in our name
  42. Afghan war is bad for security, voters say
  43. Britons question reasons for Afghan conflict: poll
  44. Afghanistan war "not keeping UK safe"
  45. Salmond in Afghan withdrawal call
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  47. 47.0 47.1 47.2 47.3 47.4 icasualties.org British deaths in Afghanistan
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  49. YouGov / Channel 4 News poll November 4–5, 2009
  50. poll November 20–22, 2009
  51. Poll: Most Say War in Afghanistan Going Badly
  52. Majority in US see Afghan war not worth cost: poll
  53. ABC News / Washington Post poll conducted November 12–15, 2009
  54. Afghan War Support Slips
  55. While Obama patiently ponders Afghan policy, impatient Americans are already deciding: poll
  56. Partisan divide widens as Obama considers Afghanistan policy
  57. Associated Press – GfK poll conducted November 5–9, 2009
  58. Americans grow more pessimistic about direction of country, poll finds
  59. Poll: Majority Opposes New Troops to Afghanistan
  60. Withdrawal edges ahead – Poll: Majority opposes new troops
  61. Americans Split on Afghanistan Troop Increase vs. Decrease
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  64. Pew Research poll conducted October 28 – November 8, 2009
  65. The 2009 Lowy Institute Poll
  66. Australians happier with US but not China The Lowy Institute poll was conducted July 13–25, 2009, and was released October 13, 2009.
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  68. Many Japanese Would Cease Afghan War Role The Yomiuri poll was conducted October 2–4, 2009.
  69. An overwhelming 84 per cent believe British troops are currently losing the war in Afghanistan The Channel 4 News / YouGov poll was conducted October 22–23, 2009
  70. Half of UK public think Afghanistan war is unwinnable
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  78. Six out of 10 Britons oppose Afghanistan war
  79. CNN Poll: Will Afghanistan turn into another Vietnam?
  80. CNN – Opinion Research poll conducted October 16–18, 2009
  81. 81.0 81.1 CNN – Opinion Research poll August 28–31, 2009
  82. 82.0 82.1 Poll: Support for Afghan war at all-time low
  83. ABC News poll conducted October 15–18, 2009
  84. Obama's Ratings Slip on Afghanistan
  85. Americans divided on Afghan troop increase
  86. Majority Want Afghan Troops Levels to Stay the Same or Be Reduced
  87. CBS News poll conducted October 5–8, 2009
  88. Poll finds skepticism on Afghanistan democracy
  89. Americans Divided on Sending More Troops to Afghanistan
  90. AP-GfK poll conducted October 1–5, 2009
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  92. Obama ponders Afghanistan troop boost
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  99. ZDF – Tagesspiegel poll conducted September 11, 2009
  100. Germans focus on Afghanistan after al-Qaida threat
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  103. ARD – Deutschlandtrend poll conducted September 10, 2009 details
  104. ARD – Deutschlandtrend poll June 2007 – September 2009
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  106. Dutch Oppose Extending Afghan Mission
  107. Poles in NATO Missions
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  110. Poll: 50% oppose U.S. surge in Afghanistan
  111. 5 US troops killed as debate grows over Afghan war
  112. New York Times / CBS News poll September 19–23, 2009
  113. Poll: Public pessimistic about Afghanistan
  114. NBC News / Wall Street Journal poll September 17–20, 2009
  115. Foreign and Domestic Polls Show Declining Support for U.S. Engagement Abroad
  116. Public Support for Afghanistan War Wanes
  117. Pew Research Center September 10–15, 2009 poll topline
  118. Public Opinion on Afghanistan: All the Numbers Get Worse
  119. Amy Goodman: U.S. must not become the evil it deplores
  120. A Skeptical View of Afghanistan
  121. Anti-War Stirrings Greet Call For More Troops
  122. Dutch still support soldiers, but not mission in Afghanistan
  123. French Majority Opposes Role in Afghanistan
  124. 124.0 124.1 124.2 Global Citizens More Cautious About Afghan War
  125. New Zealanders Agree with Afghanistan Role
  126. Pakistanis Want Out of U.S.-Led War on Terror
  127. Two-thirds want British troops home from Afghanistan
  128. The Sun / YouGov poll conducted August 28–29, 2009
  129. More than half of British public against UK mission in Afghanistan
  130. Majority of Britons 'oppose Afghan war'
  131. Two soldiers killed on foot patrol, taking Afghan death toll to 206
  132. 'Two-thirds' want UK soldiers out
  133. Poll shows most Britons oppose war in Afghanistan
  134. War set to rage until 2050
  135. YouGov poll for Sky News released August 17, 2009
  136. More British deaths as PM says Afghan mission 'vital'
  137. YouGov poll for Sky News
  138. Losing Afghanistan?
  139. West faces losing battle over Afghan poll fraud
  140. CNN Poll: Afghanistan War opposition at all-time high
  141. August Tied for Deadliest Month in Afghanistan
  142. Poll: Obama's Ratings on Afghanistan Drop
  143. Poll: Most Americans oppose more troops for Afghanistan
  144. The Economist / YouGov poll conducted August 23–25, 2009
  145. Poll: Most say Afghanistan war not worth fighting
  146. ABC News – Washington Post poll August 13–17, 2009
  147. Most Americans oppose Afghanistan war: poll
  148. Support for Afghan war drops, CNN poll finds
  149. 149.0 149.1 149.2 Britain, Canada Differ from U.S. on Afghan War
  150. 150.0 150.1 150.2 Americans Still Support Afghanistan Mission; Canadians and Britons Do Not
  151. Most Canadians oppose military role in Afghanistan
  152. Canadian soldier killed in Afghanistan
  153. Decisive opposition to Canada's Afghanistan mission
  154. Half of Czechs do not want Czech soldiers in Afghanistan – poll
  155. Finns support operations in Afghanistan despite attacks
  156. Few Finns want troops withdrawn from Afghanistan -AL/TT poll
  157. The World from Berlin – ARD poll
  158. Italians Want Troops Out of Afghanistan
  159. Dutch Ponder Future of Afghan Mission
  160. Gordon Brown is 'John Major in 1996', according to new poll
  161. YouGov/Daily Telegraph poll July 28–30, 2009
  162. Most want troops out of Afghanistan: survey
  163. Britons question Afghan war as bodies flown home
  164. Most people think British troops should leave Afghanistan, poll finds
  165. Majority in US oppose both wars
  166. Poll details: Majority in US oppose both wars
  167. Associated Press – GfK poll, July 16–20, 2009
  168. 168.0 168.1 April date for general election campaign?
  169. 169.0 169.1 Lib Dems now breathing down Labour's neck
  170. Public blames casualties in Afghanistan on poor equipment, poll shows
  171. Alan Johnson hints at April general election after Tories open 17-point lead on Labour
  172. Tories take 17-point lead in polls
  173. YouGov poll for Sunday Times, July 16–17, 2009
  174. ABC News-Washington Post Poll
  175. 175.0 175.1 U.S. Deaths Hit A Record High in Afghanistan
  176. Washington Post-ABC News poll July 15–18, 2009
  177. Americans Upbeat on Progress in Iraq, Afghanistan
  178. Bob Ainsworth forced on defensive over British strategy in Afghanistan
  179. Brown says more troops 'not needed'
  180. Tears for our brave boys
  181. 181.0 181.1 Opposition to war in Afghanistan on the rise, poll shows
  182. 182.0 182.1 182.2 182.3 Survey of public opinion on Afghan conflict finds support, and doubt
  183. 183.0 183.1 Death toll in Afghanistan fuels British opposition to war
  184. Enough. This senseless folly in Afghanistan must stop
  185. 185.0 185.1 "Public support for war in Afghanistan is firm, despite deaths"
  186. British PM under pressure over Afghanistan deaths
  187. Brown tries to buoy support for UK Afghan mission
  188. Afghan conflict support 'rises'
  189. Britain roiled by troop deaths in Afghanistan
  190. Not Calling Afghanistan a War Is a 'Semantic Farce'
  191. The Afghanistan Debate – Germany Mulls Future as Attacks Surge
  192. German leaders defend Afghan mission
  193. Double-Talk on Afghanistan Reaching 'New Level of Absurdity'
  194. "Afghan Poll 2009" (PDF). BBC News. http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/shared/bsp/hi/pdfs/05_02_09afghan_poll_2009.pdf. Retrieved August 3, 2011. 
  195. Australians Reject New Afghan Deployment
  196. Half of Canadians Adamant About Ending Afghan Mission Before 2011
  197. Four in 10 say end Afghan mission early, poll finds
  198. CNN Poll: Americans divided on Afghanistan war
  199. Half of Australians Would Leave Afghanistan
  200. Public opinion towards defence and foreign affairs: Results from the ANU poll p.14
  201. Majority Opposed to Afghan Mission, Many Concerned about New Law
  202. Rape law saps support for Afghan mission: poll
  203. Poll shows support for Taliban talks
  204. Gallup / Berlingske Tidende April 2009 poll
  205. Raus aus Afghanistan
  206. Escape from Afghanistan
  207. NATO confronted with protests
  208. Dutch Oppose Extending Afghan Mission
  209. Gordon Brown claims Nato coup over Afghanistan
  210. CNN Poll: Obama not making U.S. less safe
  211. Obama's Afghanistan Problem
  212. CBC News/New York Times poll April 6, 2009
  213. Two-thirds oppose sending more troops
  214. Australians Oppose Sending Troops to Afghanistan, Poll Says
  215. Australians oppose extra Afghan troops: poll
  216. Aussies oppose extra troops for Afghanistan: poll
  217. No blank cheque on Afghan war, says Rudd
  218. Australians: No More Troops to Afghanistan
  219. Australians oppose extra Afghan troops: poll
  220. Australians Against More Troops in Afghanistan
  221. Most Germans Want Their Troops Out Of Afghanistan – Poll
  222. Germans Would Remove Troops from Afghanistan
  223. Majority 'want Iraq war inquiry'
  224. 'Afghan war vital' but Brits want out
  225. Poll: 60pct in UK unconvinced about Afghan mission
  226. Britons Unconvinced on Afghanistan Mission
  227. Taliban chief backs Afghan peace talks
  228. YouGov / Sunday Times survey results March 12–13, 2009
  229. Poll: More view Afghan war as 'mistake'
  230. As US public sours on Afghanistan, Obama calls for 'exit strategy' – The president said the US cannot stay indefinitely
  231. Half of Canadians Would End Afghan Mission
  232. Almost Half of Canadians Would End Afghan Mission Before 2011
  233. Canada’s love affair with Barack Obama
  234. Danish troops in negotiations with moderate 'local' Taliban
  235. Poll: Most support plan to bolster U.S. troops in Afghanistan
  236. US set to pop troop question once more to Australia
  237. 238.0 238.1 Financial Times poll: Only 1-in-3 favor sending more troops to Afghanistan
  238. This article uses material from the Wikipedia article International public opinion on the war in Afghanistan in 2009, that was deleted or is being discussed for deletion, which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.
    Author(s): Gadget850 Search for "International public opinion on the war in Afghanistan in 2009" on Google
    View Wikipedia's deletion log of "International public opinion on the war in Afghanistan in 2009"
    Wikipedia-logo-v2
  239. 240.0 240.1 An unpopular war of his own (New York Times / CBS poll)
  240. 241.0 241.1 With Afghanistan Troop Decision, Obama Makes His First Major Move without Majority Support
  241. Poll: Most back Obama's troop plan for Afghanistan
  242. Americans support Obama on Afghanistan
  243. Americans See Afghanistan War as Still Worth Fighting though many would like faster withdrawal of troops than is likely
  244. Obama will seek Afghanistan troops elsewhere, MacKay says
  245. Canadians feel the love for Obama, but are lukewarm to his plans: poll
  246. 247.0 247.1 247.2 247.3 EU voters resistant to further Afghan deployments: poll
  247. 248.0 248.1 248.2 Poll shows EU resistance on Afghan war
  248. BBC World News America poll: Only one-third of Americans support troop increase in Afghanistan
  249. Nation's Hopes High for Obama, Poll Shows (Washington Post – ABC News poll)

External links

  • Rethink Afghanistan, a ground-breaking documentary focusing on key issues surrounding the war, available for viewing online in 6 parts.
Part 1: Troops  · Part 2: Pakistan  · Part 3: Cost of the War  · Part 4: Civilian Casualties  · Part 5: Women  · Part 6: Security
This article uses material from the Wikipedia article International public opinion on the war in Afghanistan in 2009, that was deleted or is being discussed for deletion, which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.
Author(s): Gareth E Kegg Search for "International public opinion on the war in Afghanistan in 2009" on Google
View Wikipedia's deletion log of "International public opinion on the war in Afghanistan in 2009"
Wikipedia-logo-v2

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