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Wallabies (Left to right) Drew Mitchell, Luke Burgess, Dean Mumm, Berrick Barnes and Budgy Smugglers "chief smuggler" Adam Linforth strut their stuff in Coogee, Sydney.

Budgy Smuggler is an Australian Swimwear Label producing Australian Made 'speedo' style swimwear. The company draws its name from the Australian slang term for speedo style swimwear. Literally the phrase means to conceal a small native bird. The brand has risen to prominence through popularity with Australian sporting stars [1] & a cult following of its innovative YouTube videos such as "Kori Gable: Looking for Love" [2]

Company History

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Cliff top smuggling.

Like many great Australian inventions, Budgy Smuggler was founded in a backyard in 2004 when a group of mates thought it would be funny to print "budgy smuggler" on the back of a pair of swimwear. While the men had great ideas, they were not great spellers, and the first swimwear had the incorrect spelling 'budgy' rather than 'budgie' printed. The decision was made to continue with the incorrect spelling.

The company has involved a number of successful young Australians including former Press Secretary to the Prime Minister & Bondi Belts owner Lachlan Harris,[3] Channel 9 Today Show Executive Producer Tom Malone [4] & current Chief Smuggler Adam Linforth

The History of Budgy Smuggling in Australia

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Tony Abbott competing in a charity swim

Australian Men were the founders of Budgy Smuggling worldwide. The swimwear has featured heavily through Australian culture. In particular, the swimwear is iconic amongst Australian Life Savers and has even featured in promotions for non-water related sports such as Rugby League. Tina Turner's 1989 and 1990 Rugby League promotional clips are a prime example of this. Australian politicians have also regularly donned budgy smugglers, such as leader of the Liberal National Coalition, Tony Abbott.

Images From Around The World

Budgy Smuggler has developed a cult following of people capturing smuggling moments from around the world and posting them to its Facebook fan page.[5]

Products

Budgy Smuggler makes a variety of products. Their most notable being the traditional budgy smuggler for men, a women's range, Smugglettes, a small range for children and a range of accessories including a variety of hats and t-shirts.

See also

Website: www.budgysmuggler.com.au[6]

Swim Briefs (suit style)

References

  1. http://www.brisbanetimes.com.au/executive-style/style/return-of-the-budgie-smuggler-20101020-16u1n.html
  2. http://www.youtube.com/budgysmuggler
  3. http://www.smh.com.au/national/political-ties-cut-rudds-spin-merchant-belts-up-20101218-191b9.html
  4. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Today_(Australian_TV_program)
  5. http://www.facebook.com/#!/pages/Budgy-Smuggler/335428438500
  6. http://www.budgysmuggler.com.au
This article uses material from the Wikipedia article Budgy smuggler, that was deleted or is being discussed for deletion, which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.
Author(s): Torsch Search for "Budgy smuggler" on Google
View Wikipedia's deletion log of "Budgy smuggler"
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